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Decisive Victory 大决战 Episode 40 Recap

Hu Lian, deputy commander of the 12th Corps of the Kuomintang Army, met with Chiang Kai-shek in Nanjing. The 12th Corps was besieged, and Jiang Jieshi ordered Hu Lian to go to the front line to command and reverse the predicament of the 12th Corps. Fu Zuoyi and Liu Houtong discussed Mao Zedong as a person. He frankly said that Chiang Kai-shek’s power is now weakening. Fu Zuoyi uses Peiping as a bargaining chip to negotiate with the Communist Party to gain some political capital.

If Mao Zedong does not accept such negotiations, then he will stick to Peking. He believes that things will happen. There is a turnaround. Lin Biao’s army of the Eastern Wilderness began to move southward, and he must fight for the liberation of Pingjin. At the same time, Fu Zuoyi tried every means to withdraw the people from the Central Army, and the defenders on the Peking Line and Heping Sui Line had to be rearranged.

Chiang Kai-shek privately asked Shi Jue and Li Wen to prepare to withdraw south. Fu Zuoyi was so powerful in North China that he would not be dissent. At least Li Wen felt that he must not have nothing to do with the Communist Party. Fu Zuoyi told his subordinates about his deployment, and he instructed his subordinates to stick to Pingjinzhang and never retreat no matter what happens.

After Du Yuming withdrew from Xuzhou, the People’s Liberation Army entered the city. The people warmly welcomed Xuzhou and Xuzhou was finally liberated. Su Yu was leading the People’s Liberation Army to march quickly to chase Du Yuming’s troops. Du Yuming took great pains to escape. If his troops and Huang Wei troops rendezvous, the consequences would be disastrous. Su Yu ordered to continue to accelerate and must stop Du Yuming in Yongcheng.

The Central Military Commission was anxious and worried that Du Yuming would rendezvous with the Huangwei Corps. They also realized that the news from Nanjing this time was very different from the real news. They suspected that the identity of the comrades lurking around the Kuomintang was suspected. The People’s Liberation Army marched day and night, and finally arrived at Yongcheng to establish a position before Du Yuming.

Du Yuming led a hundred thousand people and was unable to walk fast, so he had to rest in the Mengji garrison on the outskirts of Yongcheng and prepare to attack Yongcheng. Gu Zhutong reported to Chiang Kai-shek about Du Yuming’s movements, as well as the results of investigating Guo Rugui and determined that Guo Rugui had no problem. Chiang Kai-shek felt that Du Yuming was caught in factional fighting and his attitude towards Du Yuming was not as good as before.

Chiang Kai-shek ordered Du Yuming to bring hundreds of thousands of troops to relieve Huang Wei’s troubles. Some people suggested that they should proceed as originally planned and break through Yongcheng before relieving Huang Wei’s troubles. This could make up for the merits. Some people also opposed it. In the end, Du Yuming could only agree with Chiang Kai-shek’s troubles. New combat arrangements. Stuart hoped that Chiang Kai-shek would give his place to Li Zongren and Bai Chongxi, but Chiang Kai-shek was unwilling.

After a conversation with Stuart, Chiang Kai-shek couldn’t eat it. Chiang Ching-kuo brought it to eat, and Chiang Kai-shek had no appetite. Chiang Kai-shek went through a lifetime of ups and downs. He thought that Li Zongren, Bai Chongxi and others were not his opponents. What he feared most was Mao Zedong, a villager, who would exhaust the Kuomintang.

Hua Ye’s artillery helped Zhong Ye, and Chen Geng also told his comrades to learn more from Hua Ye to dig trenches. He accidentally heard the art troupe singing, and Chen Geng asked the art troupe to help them compose a song for the lyrics. He also accidentally learned that the poem was written by Chen Jie to Lu Juemin, but he didn’t expect it to spread among the troops. Tiedan sent pork stuffed buns, saying that they were given to them by the Communist army, and Yang Botao began to doubt Tiedan’s identity.

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