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Introduction to the flag of Denmark

The Danish flag is also called “Dannebrog” (Danish: Dannebrog), which means “Danish flag” or “red flag”. The Danish flag is the oldest and oldest side of the flags still in use today, and is known as the “Power of the Danes”. It is rectangular with a ratio of length to width of 37:28. The flag ground is red, with a white cross-shaped pattern on the flag surface, slightly to the left.

Introduction

The Danish flag is also called “Dannebrog” (Danish: Dannebrog), which means “Danish flag” or “red flag”. Legend has it that in a war, the heavens gave the Dan army a red flag with a white cross on it, turning it from a predicament into a victory. Since then, the red flag of the white cross has become the national flag of the Kingdom of Denmark. The cross pattern of the flag indicates the special relationship between Iceland and Denmark in the history of Iceland.

History

The Danish flag is the oldest national flag among the current national flags and has been in use since 1219. Rectangle, the ratio of length to width is 37:28. There is a white cross on the red flag, slightly to the left. According to the Danish epic, in 1219, the Danish King Valdemar Victoris (also known as the Victory King) led an army to fight against the Estonian pagans.

During the battle at Lundanes on June 15, the Danish army was in trouble. Suddenly, a red flag with a white cross fell from the sky, accompanied by a loud voice: “Grab this flag is victory!” Encouraged by this flag, the Dan army fought bravely and turned defeat into victory. Since then, the white cross red flag has become the national flag of the Kingdom of Denmark. Up to now, on June 15th, Denmark celebrates “Flag Day” or “Valdemar Day”. The Danish flag is called “the power of the Danes”.

Legend

According to Danish epic records, this flag was not designed by people, but dropped from the sky. In the war between Denmark and Estonia in 1219, the inferior Danish army saw this flag flying from the fingers of the gods, a Danish soldier raised it high, and the Danish army turned defeat into victory. Since then this flag has become a symbol of the Danish nation. Today, Denmark also holds a celebration on June 15 every year to commemorate the National Flag Day, the “Valdemar Day”.

Influence

The Danish flag has a long history and has had a significant impact on the design of the flags of many other countries, especially the Nordic countries. Other countries adopting similar flag designs include Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland. Other Christian countries also imitated various cross patterns to design their national flags, and later in the Middle Ages, almost all countries used religious symbols to design their national flags (the crescent moon of Islamic countries, the giant moon of Israel, the lion of Sri Lanka, the sun of Japan).

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